How a short course can boost your resilience, improve wellbeing and why it should be a priority

With 12.8 million working days lost to stress, anxiety and depression every year we face an important challenge around mental health. Surprisingly little research has been done previously to evaluate ways to improve wellbeing for the general population, especially in local communities. Our resilience programmes take a unique, evidence-informed approach and a key result is both promising and exciting. It offers a unique opportunity to make a really big difference in improving people's lives and increasing national wellbeing.

0
%
average reduction in anxiety
0
%
reduction in the number of people indicating possible need for clinical intervention
0
%
reduction in number of people indicating an urgent need for intervention
“ Our research backs up what hundreds of people are telling us - taking part in our resilience programme is life changing. "

Emma Ogilvie - The Resilience Development Company

 

Why these results are so exciting

900 participants completed a 7-item validated questionnaire (GAD-7) routinely used across both Primary Care and Mental Health settings as a pre-screening tool to measure the presence of and severity of symptoms of excessive, exaggerated anxiety and worry. All participants were unaware of the significance of the questions and were accessing our programme in the workplace or school.

Of the 900 people in our research group the following % of people were in each category before their programme:

0
%
Thriving
0
%
Surviving
0
%
Suffering

As a direct result of their programme, this changed to:

0
%
Thriving
0
%
Surviving
0
%
Suffering

The shifts in each category are significant as is the potential:

+
0
%
-
0
%
-
0
%
“ The shift in people's anxiety levels is both significant and exciting.  24% of people showed signs of severe anxiety before the programme. This number reduced to 13% as a result of the programme. Applying that shift to the UK population would be life-changing  for 7.6million people. Imagine the financial savings it could make to our mental health services. Now imagine the opportunity those savings would create."

David Ogilvie - The Resilience Development Company

 

Questions

Discover more about the detail behind the data

We'd be delighted to answer any other questions or comments you may have. We are passionate about our work and believe in sharing and building on our results. Please contact us. We'd love to talk and see where we can take this together.

The Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) questionnaire is a seven-item, self-report anxiety questionnaire designed to assess a patient's health status during the previous 2 weeks. This tool is used for screening and monitoring symptom severity and cannot replace a clinical assessment and diagnosis.

We use it to demonstrate a reduction in the indicators. The 7 questions are asked as part of our on-line evaluation of our programmes and used purely for research purposes. All data is anonymous. All data is provided for observation only.

Everyday people experiencing our programme. That ranges from students in schools, professionals in the workplace and parents in the home. We work with a diverse range of organisations and so the data includes people such as Prison officers, senior executives, teachers and office workers.

We measure many outcomes in our programmes such as resilience, productivity, adaption to change and optimism. GAD-7 is just one aspect of wellbeing and performance we measure.

Whilst an oversimplification we find segmenting health at a population level into thriving, surviving and suffering useful for discussion. To do this, GAD-7 scores are converted into:

  • 0-4 Thriving
  • 5-9 Surviving
  • 10+ Suffering

Generally speaking a score of 10 or greater on the GAD-7 represents a reasonable cut off fro identifying cases of GAD. Cut points of 5,10 and 15 may be interpreted as representing mild, moderate and severe levels of anxiety on the GAD-7, similar levels to depression on the PHQ-9.

 

Discover more

Wondering where to go next? Ideally, we'd like you to get in touch but if you need a little more information before you do, we've selected related services & articles for you below: