Beating your Bias

Research tells us we have approximately 60,000 thoughts each day, and in order to function quickly our brain takes mental shortcuts by operating the majority of the time in ‘fast thinking’ mode.

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In your third session we showed you how our cognitive bias’ can distort our understanding of the world around us.

Research tells us we have approximately 60,000 thoughts each day, and in order to function quickly our brain takes mental shortcuts by operating the majority of the time in ‘fast thinking’ mode.

Fast thinking mode is fast and emotional

Remember the Thinking Traps we showed you? Fast thinking mode unconsciously sets its own context and has a huge impact on our experience and behaviours. It can compromise our ability to make accurate decisions when we are cognitively busy and over worked, when we are distracted or under time pressure. In order to beat this evolutionary bias and remain productive, it’s important to learn to recognise when our fast thinking is tripping us up and affecting our judgement and relationships with those around us.

The reality is we work better and make more accurate and helpful decisions when we beat the bias and balance our thinking

In a world where our FIRES are potentially ignited every single minute, oscillation is a challenge and our workload is increasing exponentially, learning strategies to slow our thinking down and become less reactive and more proactive is key to survival in today’s workplace.

4 ways to beat the bias and challenge our fast thinking

1. Understand and recognise your stress triggers – it’s much easier to regulate our thinking once we’re aware of the triggers and reflect on why we are feeling a certain way.

2. Tune in to your body – Learn to notice the signs of cognitive exhaustion and take regular breaks. Leaving you with more energy to engage in ‘slow thinking’. Remember you can always revisit this area covered in session two using your online access and session two blog. Practicing your Stress Less session skills improves focus and promotes a more proactive and positive mind set.

3. Remember to ABC it and check for Thinking Traps – to help our understanding of why we feel or think a certain way. Slowing our thought process down in this way means we are more able to manage stress triggers and thinking to respond in a much more beneficial way.

4. Check in with others – if you have left these sessions genuinely believing your thinking is balanced and your behaviour is positive, ask those around you or better still, go home and do the same!

Want some reminders on the skills we showed you? Download our app from the Play or Apple Store. Just search for “Resilience Development Company.” Access to it is free, it’s full of information and it’s there for your personal use as part of the programme.

Want to know which skills are best for you to focus on from this session? Sign into the Skills Academy and visit our Skills Checkers.

Please note: This post was specifically written for people attending week three of our nine week resilience programme where we showed you how to maintain flexible and balanced thinking to drive performance, well-being and effectiveness.

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